RESEARCH ARTICLE


Teaching Clinical Judgment: a Review with Consideration of Applications for Health Professions



Ann Gaba*
Hunter College, City University of New York, School of Public Health, 2180 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10035, USA


© 2015 Ann Gaba

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Hunter College, City University of New York, School of Public Health, 2180 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10035, USA; E-mail:agaba@hunter.cuny.edu


Abstract

This review explores the concept of clinical judgment and its relationship to critical thinking. A systematic review of the literature was performed in PubMed, using the key words “clinical judgment,” and limiting the search to papers published in English. A hand search located additional pertinent documents. While papers on clinical judgment specifically in nutrition and dietetics are scarce, literature from other disciplines can inform this discussion. How these essential skills are taught and learned in the health professions, and some theoretical views of this area are examined. Following this, the underlying philosophy and educational models are discussed. Lastly, specific educational methods and strategies are described as illustrative examples of how these theoretical concepts can be applied in training health professionals.

Keywords: Clinical judgment, critical thinking, educational models, educational philosophy.