RESEARCH ARTICLE


Training Dietetic Interns to do Outcomes Research/Management using Community-based Participatory Research



Tanya M. Horacek*
Department of Public Health, Food Studies and Nutrition, David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, Syracuse University, 506 McNaughton Hall, Syracuse, NY 13244-3240, USA


© 2015 Tanya M. Horacek

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Public Health, Food Studies and Nutrition, David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, Syracuse University, 506 McNaughton Hall, Syracuse, NY 13244-3240, USA; Tel: 315-443-9323; Fax: 315-443-9807; E-mail:thoracek@syr.edu


Abstract

Abstract: Dietetic Interns (DIs) need effective supervised practice opportunities to apply the principles of program development, implementation, evaluation, and particularly, outcomes management. Outcomes management tracks data to improve practices, outcomes, effectiveness and efficiency. The Nutrition Care Process guides outcomes management in dietetics. Merging it with Community-based Participatory Research (CBPR) can insure more appropriate and sustainable outcomes and processes. Syracuse University’s dietetic internship provides a concentration in outcomes management. Through a three-credit graduate class, DIs learn CBPR, specifically the PRECEDE-PROCEED model. The model covers how to collaborate with their community, collect/analyze data, design an objective-driven outcomes management project, and to marshal available resources for meeting the identified health needs of the community. A preceptor and advisory panel collaborate with a team of DIs for each project. This paper describes the structure of the class used to teach DIs to do outcomes management using CBPR. DIs and graduate students completed a survey designed for this research, which assessed their perceptions of the effectiveness and their satisfaction with the class, rotation/experience, and the barriers, benefits and lessons learned using CBPR. Although participants found learning and implementing PRECEDE-PROCEED to be complicated, they rated the experience as effective for: 1) building appropriate entry-level dietetic competencies, 2) collaborating with the community and 3) designing effective and sustainable outcomes management projects. They were satisfied with their abilities, effort and outcomes. The benefits, challenges and proposed improvements for the experience and training are discussed.

Keywords: Dietetic interns, outcomes management, community-based participatory research.